Counting to Christmas

Courting to Christmas Book CoverTafuri, Nancy. Counting to Christmas. Roxbury, CT: Duck Pond Press, 2005.

Yesterday, we brought out the Christmas decorations.  We put up the incredibly tacky, blow-up “Santa Sleigh” Rocket in the front yard. We put up the tree and trimmed it with lights and ornaments.  When the girls were little we might have stretched these maneuvers over several days as a count to Christmas.

One of my greatest pleasures at this time of year is to bring out my collection of Christmas books.  Yesterday, I brought them out.  How I love to look at each and every one.  It makes me remember when I bought some of them and how much fun we had reading them together.  At one time or another, they were a part of our count to Christmas.

This lovely book is a new pleasure for me and an excellent addition to my collection. It is a story of a little girl and her preparations for this holiday.  She is counting to Christmas. I read on the book jacket that the author shared her family’s favorite holiday crafts and activities. I bought this book, because it reminded me of our Advent calendar activities.  These were some of our favorite activities, too! We haven’t counted to Christmas in a number of years, but I still remember how much fund we had.  As we did, the girl in this story makes Christmas cards with paper, paint and glue.  She writes and sends letters to the people important in her life, including Santa.  She mails her cards. We mailed ours, too, but we had a special ritual for the letters to Santa.  We used to write letters and send them to Santa via smoke signals (we burned them in the fireplace).

What count to Christmas doesn’t include baking?  She makes elaborate gingerbread cookies and lovingly decorates them. The author included a recipe here, if you are keen to try your hand at them.  We liked making cookies, too.  Our favorites to bake were, and still are, cowboy cookies, Russian tea cakes, double chocolate bourbon cookies, and giant ginger cookies.  We used to bake cookies and give them to all of the girls’ teachers.  We had a great time in the kitchen together.

The girl in this story makes animal treats for the wild things that live near her home.  We did that too.  We used to string popcorn with cranberries and hang them on the tree in our backyard.  We made the pinecones with peanut butter and birdseed animal feeders.  It was a messy fun project. Her snowy backyard is filled with many animals large and small like mice and birds and deer and bear.  They all come to enjoy her treats.  Here in this part of Texas, we don’t have snow.  Even with no snow, we have enjoyed watching animals come to our backyard.  We have deer and fox and rabbits and roadrunners.

Here is a charming book to add to your Christmas book collection.  The illustrations are soft and warm.  The child is a delight.  It would be a comfy book to snuggle up and read. It might be a good addition to your count to Christmas.

Nancy Tafuri

Nancy Tafuri has the great fortune of doing what she loves, writing and illustrating books for children. Here are her words on this subject. “I feel honored to be creating literature for young children. The early years in a person’s life are so important, I can only hope that my books can contribute in some small way to that growth.”

Here are 8 facts about this author.

  1. She has always liked art. She convinced her Home Economics teacher to allow her to paint a mural instead of making a dress.
  2. She attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City.
  3. Her first job was as an assistant art director with Simon & Schuster. She went on to open a graphic design studio with her husband Tom.
  4. One of her favorite early books was The Little Engine That Could¹.  She has something in common with out family, we love that book, too!
  5. Her illustrations were not accepted at first. They were considered “too graphic” for children of 5, 6, and 7 in the early 1970’s. ¹
  6. She lives in Connecticut. She writes and illustrates in a converted chicken shed, which over looks a duck pond.
  7. Perhaps her studio over looks the duck pond represented in her Caldecott Honor Book, Have You Seen My Duckling?
  8. She loves nature.  She says that it is always auditioning for her.

For more information on Nancy Tafuri, check out these websites.

¹http://childliterature.blogspot.com/2012/02/interview-with-nancy-tafuri-and.html

Advertisements

A Turkey for Thanksgiving

Book cover with moose, rabbit and turkeyBunting, Eve.  A Turkey for Thanksgiving.  Illustrated by Diane de Groat. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

I was at home this week preparing for the upcoming holiday.  In the mornings, I listened to the newscasts.  I was completely amused by the two early morning news anchors on Monday. There was a filler article on the annual Presidential Turkey Pardon.  Did you know there was an annual Turkey Pardon?  I don’t know, why turkeys need a pardon.  What is their crime, not enough dark meat? At any rate, the male news anchor was pretty disgusted by the whole idea.  He thought that it was a significant waste of resources.  Evidently the two turkeys, in this case Beau and Tye, were put up for a few days at the Willard Hotel to await their pardon.  The other news anchor commented on the turkeys’ names.  The male anchor noted that better names for the turkeys would have been Lunch and Dinner.  At 6 am, I thought this was hysterical (housework and early hours can warp the mind). The pardoned turkeys live out the rest of their days at Gobbler’s Rest at Virginia Tech.   A most peaceful end for each of them.   Soon after this segment, I went to look for a Thanksgiving book for this blog.  I found this one and thought it would be a perfect book to share for the holiday.

In this story, Mr. & Mrs. Moose are preparing for Thanksgiving dinner.  Their friends, Sheep, Rabbit, Porcupine, and Mr. & Mrs. Goat are coming and they are making everything just so for their friends.  They were looking over their decorations and all looked good, especially the paper turkey.   Alas, Mrs. Moose was sad.

Mrs. Moose sighed. “Yes. But I wish we had a real turkey for Thanksgiving. Everyone always has a turkey for Thanksgiving. Everyone but us.”

Mr. Moose nuzzled Mrs. Moose’ head. “Well that won’t do. I will go this minute and find you a turkey for Thanksgiving.

Off he goes to find Mrs. Moose a turkey for Thanksgiving. As he wanders to find one, he enlists the help of all his friends.  They find the turkey in his nest.  The turkey runs away despite Mr. Moose sweetly telling him they want him for Thanksgiving dinner.  Is there a happy ending for Mr. Turkey? Why yes there is!  A chair at the table for Mr. Turkey right next to Mrs. Moose!  He surveys the table of all the good food Mrs. Moose has prepared.

“I hope you find something her to your liking, Mr. Turkey,” Mrs. Moose said.  “I wasn’t sure of your taste.

“You are so kind to worry about my taste,” Turkey said. “I thought you’d be worrying about how I’d taste.”

“Heavens, no!” Mr. Moose smiled his big-toothed smile…. “It’s so nice to have friends around the table at Thanksgiving.”

It was a Happy Thanksgiving for Mr. Turkey.  He was at the table and not on it.  He has new friends for Thanksgiving.

What an amusing take on the turkey and Thanksgiving! Perhaps, Beau and Tye, will meet new turkey friends at Gobbler’s Rest?   They will be at the table and not on it, too!

I liked this charming book.  Eve’s words along with Diane’s lovely watercolor pictures make it a pleasure to read.  I bought it to share with my preschool class.  They loved the story.

Whether a turkey is on your table or at your table (sometimes it can be both), I hope all of you have a lovely Thanksgiving Day.

The Halloween Tree: A Story of Friendship, Bravery, and Our Halloween Traditions

Halloween TreeBradbury, Ray. The Halloween Tree. Illustrated by Joseph Mugnaini. New York: Yearling Book, 1972.

Happy Halloween (a bit belated)! Here is a book that celebrates all the traditions of this season. Here is an education of the history of Halloween so carefully woven into a story of nine boys, you miss the education.  The book opens with these words:

It was a small town by a small river and a small lake in a small northern part of a Midwest state.  There wasn’t so much wilderness around you couldn’t see the town. But on the other hand there wasn’t so much town you couldn’t see and feel and touch and smell the wilderness.  The town was full of trees. And dry grass and deaf flower now that autumn was here.  And full of fences to walk on and sidewalks to skate on and a large ravine to tumble in and yell across.  And the town was full of …. Boys.

I love this ordinary setting in our United States for a launching pad for the adventures of eight boys and their special friend, Pipkin.  They are costumed for Halloween as a skeleton, witch, ape man, gargoyle, beggar, mummy, ghost, and death.  They leave their houses. They run and shriek and laugh and jump and frolic.  It’s Halloween! They stop to take count. Something is wrong.  There are eight where there should be nine.  Where is Pipkin? He would never miss Halloween!  Why is this boy so special? Here’s what Bradbury tells us about Pipkin.

Joe Pipkin was the greatest boy who ever lived. The grandest boy who ever fell out of a tree and laughed at the joke. The finest boy who ever raced around the track, winning, and then, seeing his friends a mile back somewhere, stumbled and fell, waited for them to catch up and joined, breast and breast, breaking the winner’s tape.

These and many more accolades are heaped upon Pipkin.  How could these boys have Halloween without him?  What is wrong? They scramble over to his house. Pipkin steps out.  He looks bad.  Will he trick or treat with them?  He asks them to head to the place of Haunts and he will meet them there. They go to the only house worth visiting on Halloween.  They round the side of the house and there it is, a tree, a hundred feet tall and hung with pumpkins of every shape and variety, the Halloween Tree! Each pumpkin was carved with an elaborate face.  As the boys watched, all the pumpkins light up! Each frightening, carved face is aglow. From this splendor comes Carapace Clavicle Moundshroud, a ghoulish person, who offers them a trick.

These boys are wary of Moundshroud.  They aren’t sure they like his trick. They are waiting for Pipkin.  They spy him at a distance, when something dark whisks him away.  These brave boys, must rescue their friend.  The boys enlist the aid of the skeletal Moundshroud.  He promises to help them find and rescue Pipkin.  Away the boys are whisked to the past, chasing Pipkin through the centuries.  Each time and place they visit teaches them something about the traditions of Halloween.  Each festival from ones in Ancient Egypt to Día de los Muertos in Mexico is an exciting adventure.  They see the Feast of Samhain, The Time of the Old Ones, All Soul’s Day, All Saint’s Day, The Day of the Dead, El Día De Muerte, All Hallows!  All are some variation of Halloween.  As Moundshround says: “Night and day. Summer and winter, boys. Seedtime and harvest. Life and death.  That’s what Halloween is, all rolled up in one.”

Finally, in Mexico in the celebration of the Day of the Dead, they find Pipkin.  He may or may not be dead. Can they rescue him? What is the price?  It is a year from each young life. Will each brave boy give up a year of his life to save their dear friend?  Would you?

Ray Bradbury’s story is rich with symbolism and imagery.  It is difficult to give you a sense of this story.  I chose this book because it is my daughter, Alexis’ favorite. I can see why. It is creepy, exciting, and lyric all at the same time.  Ray Bradbury’s prose is evocative and wonderful.

This story set in an ordinary Midwest city, and that makes me remember.  I was raised in an ordinary Midwest city.  On Halloween, it was cool and crisp.  The trees had lost their leaves.  We lived in a housing subdivision, referred to by my folks, as the “Heslop Hatchery” for its sheer number of young children living in the neighborhood.  We leapt and gamboled and wandered carefree through the neighborhood my sister and me.  We met our friends and trick or treated throughout the entire neighborhood. Our bags must have been so heavy!

This story makes me remember Halloween past in various places not only the ones in my Midwest city. We lived in Greece for a time on a job site out in the country side.  I remember the terrific parties devised by the moms to keep us entertained.

I remember my Mom and Dad, who have both passed away.  They enjoyed this holiday, too.  I wish I had a story of their youth to share with you.  I do remember a couple of Halloween parties, they had.  It was fun to see grown-ups dress up.  I have some old film of one of these parties and it looks like they were having a terrific time.

I remember celebrating Halloween with our girls.  We had one girl, who always dressed as something gruesome and one who always dressed as something pretty.  I remember a Halloween, we had the Grim Reaper and a Princess and one with Pocahontas and Peter Pan.

I was discussing this story with my husband.  He too, remembers Halloweens past.  He shared some of his remembrances with me.  Here they are for you.

Well, here I am at 60, thinking about Halloween.  This was one of my favorite times when growing up.  While the candy was great, designing costumes was even better.  In 3rd grade, out teacher taught us how to make papier- mâché masks for art.  The masks were finished before Halloween.  This mask, though simple, was very cool.  I got to use my imagination to make my own Halloween mask!  It was mine and totally unique.  No one else would be wearing my same mask!

The papier- mâché mask led to other more elaborate costumes.  It turns out that boxes, hose and paint can make cool costumes.  I was always a fan of Jules Verne stories and it occurred to me that I could be Captain Nemo.  I don’t remember all the details (too long ago) but I do remember using these boxes and hose to make a diving helmet, air tank and hose that joined them.  The following year I went all fantasy and created a dragon outfit.  Again, boxes were used to create the head and mouth of the dragon.  Cardboard and strap was used to create the wings.  One house I went to that year loved the originality and DIY nature of the outfit and doubled my candy!

The last year I trick or treated I recalled the papier-mâché mask of long ago.  I decided to make something totally different.  The mask was in two parts, a round nose portion and a large mask to cover the head.  To this I added some simple electronics to my late 1960’s costume.  I fitted a colored light on the top of the head portion of the mask and one on the nose.  These were wired to a battery and switch that went through my jacket sleeve and into my hand.  As I walked down the street I blinked the nose and head lights.  It was gratifying when, the next day, I heard someone in school talking about a costume they had seen in my neighborhood with blinking lights!

These are our thoughts and the great Ray Bradbury’s thoughts and reflections.  Pick up a copy of The Halloween Tree and savor it.  Do you give Halloween gifts?  This would be a great one!  Read and remember.

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat

An old lady is swallowing a bat.Colandro, Lucille. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat. Illustrated by Jared Lee. New York: Scholastic, 2005.

Last year a stroll through Barnes and Noble provided me with the wonderful Madeleine parody, Frankenstein: A Monstrous Parody. This year a stroll through the book section at Target brought me this little jewel.  I had to have it for my book collection.

I loved the original story, I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly.  It is fun, but a little creepy to sing, as it begins and ends with something unexpected.

First line: I know an old lady, who swallowed a fly. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly. I guess she’ll die.

Last line: I know an old lady, who swallowed a horse. She’s dead, of course!

If you need to reacquaint yourself with this little ditty, you can listen to Judy Collins sing it for Kermit the Frog on YouTube: https://youtu.be/qC_xO2aN_IA. It is fun, but a little gruesome.

This book caught my attention as it is a version of that rather gruesome story and it is illustrated by one of my favorites, Jared Lee.  I wondered, if this parody was a creepy as it base story.  It is after all, a Halloween story.  It is not quite as creepy, but just as eerily delightful.

There is no mystery here, you know how the book begins, “I know an old lady, who swallowed a bat! I don’t know why she swallowed a bat. Imagine that.” Before I opened the book past the first page, I speculated on what she might have swallowed to catch that bat.  Here’s my next line.

I know an old lady, who swallowed a cat. Imagine that to swallow a cat.  She swallowed the cat to catch the bat that flitted and darted and flapped inside her. I don’t know why she swallowed the bat. Imagine that!

It is no wonder I am not a children’s book author.  Still speculation is fun.  In this case she swallowed an owl and the old lady began to howl.  The book goes on to rhyme through cat, ghost, goblin, bones, and wizard. It is a treat to see her eat her way through this silly book. Do you think it will end in her demise?  Pick up a copy and read and sing it to the next group of “Trick or Treaters” that come to your door.  Will they appreciate this silly trick before they get their treat? Listen to Judy’s version, drag out your guitar, and serenade your neighborhood friends with this interesting little ditty.

Welcome Spring: The Legend of the Bluebonnet

bluebonnet_legendDe Paola, Tomie.  The Legend of the Bluebonnet. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1983.

Today is the first official day of spring.  From here the days get longer and the nights get shorter until we reach the summer solstice. In my patch of Northern, Central Texas, it has felt like spring for at least a month. We have had warm days into the 70s and 80s and cool evenings down into the 50s.  It is one of my favorite seasons.  As I write, I am sitting in my backyard with a glass of iced tea and a gentle breeze blowing across me.  It is a practically, perfect day.

In Texas, a herald of spring is the Texas Bluebonnet.  As soon as the weather starts to warm up in late February or early March, they begin to bloom.  If you drive through our state during this time, you will see swaths of highway medians and roadsides covered with their bright blue flowers.  We can thank Lady Bird Johnson for their generous displays, but that is another story. As I was shuffling through my books looking for a book about spring, I found this one.  It combines my favorite time of year, with one of my favorite flowers in a book by one of my favorite authors/illustrators. Like the day, it is practically, perfect in every way.

In this version of the legend, there had been a great drought and the Comanche people were dying.  For three days, they prayed and danced and drummed begging the Great Spirits to send them healing rains.  At last their shaman spoke words from the Great Spirits.  The Comanche people had become selfish.  The people had taken and they had not given back.  Only a burnt offering of a valued possession with its ashes scattered to the winds would save the people.  The Comanche people retired to their tipis to consider the best sacrifice, each one thinking that the Great Spirits would not want their treasured items.  Only a child, She-Who-Is-Alone was wise, generous, and brave enough to find a sacrifice.  What does she have that will serve?  Through the drought and the famine, she lost all her family, the only thing she had left was a warrior doll, made by her mother with bright blue feathers from a Jay brought to her by her father.  It is precious to her.  As deep night settled and everyone slumbered, she left the village and went to the hill, where the shaman received the words from the Great Spirits.  She lit a small fire, prayed to the Spirits, and thrust her precious doll into the fire.  When the ashes cooled, she scooped them up and scattered them to the four winds.  Was her sacrifice enough?  She laid down on the hillside and fell asleep.  She woke with the morning light and to her surprise the hillside was covered in blue flowers, the same blue as the feathers on her warrior doll.  The Great Spirits had forgiven the people and sent them the healing rains.  Every year the hillsides of Texas bloom with these bright blue flowers, our Texas Bluebonnets, to remind us of the sacrifice of a brave and faithful girl.

This book is a glorious retelling of this story.  See if you can find a copy to read to someone special on a bright spring day.

Here are some pictures of bluebonnets and other wild flowers growing in or near my yard.  Happy Spring!!!

Bluebonnets from my neighbor’s yard!  Alas we have none in our yard this year.

bluebonnets2

Here is a picture of our back 40.  It is dotted with Anemones in white and purple.  They are usually the first wildflowers to bloom in our yard.  It also is sprinkled with the tiny pick flowers of the False Garlic plant. Jim waits as long as possible in the spring to mow back here.  We love the sea of small wildflowers we have.

back40

Here is one of the hardier Texas perennials.  It is Prairie Verbena.  It blooms all summer long.  It is a bright beacon on the green landscape.

verbena

And last, but not least, one of my personal favorites the Dotted Blue-Eyed Grass.  It is from the Iris family.  They have little blue heads springing up from grassy leaves and stems.

DottedBlueEyedGrass

If you don’t live in Texas, please enjoy all the blossoms.  If you do live in Texas, I hope you get a chance to get out and see our spectacular wildflower displays.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day: Paddy’s Pay Day

PaddyDay, Alexandra.  Paddy’s Pay Day. New York: Puffin Books, 1989.

Okay, this book isn’t about St. Patrick’s Day, but I think of it often on this day.  Paddy, an Irish Terrier is the subject of the book.  He is a charming character.  As you would suppose, Paddy has no words.  You can read the book and imagine what he would say, if he could.

Paddy works with Trilby O’Farrell. They do tricks and acrobatics for carnivals, parties, and benefits.  Every month, Paddy gets his pay and he goes to the nearest village to spend it.  Although Paddy has no words, the everyone in the nearby village him recognizes him and interacts with him just like he could talk.

What do you do when you get paid? Do you buy yourself a treat?  Do you take care of personal chores, like getting a haircut?  Do you spend some of your pay on donations to good causes? Do you look for some entertainment, like a going to a movie?  Do you treat yourself at a meal at your favorite restaurant?  Do you buy little gifts for your friends?  In this book, you can follow Paddy and see how he spends his day off! It really is a lovely book to share with a child.

In the story, Paddy has his usual monthly meal at Murphy’s. It must be an Irish Pub! He treats himself to a baked potato with all the fixings and Guinness beer.  While it is not Paddy’s usual meal here is a special one, he might enjoy at Murphy’s on St. Patrick’s Day.  If you want to try it with your family or friends, I have listed the recipes for the stew and the bread.  Guinness, of course, holds the recipe for the beer and I purchased the truffles at my local HEB grocery store.

StPatrickDinnerA St. Patrick’s Day Menu for Paddy

Robin’s Irish Stew
Irish Soda Bread
Guinness Extra Stout
Irish Cream and Irish Coffee Truffles

Robin’s Irish Stew

Here’s my take on Irish Stew.  I didn’t have a recipe for one so I made this one up.

  • 2 c chopped onion (about 1 large. I like sweet onions, like 10/15)
  • 1 c chopped celery (about 3 large stalks)
  • 2 c sliced carrots
  • 3 c dices potatoes (about 4 medium potatoes)
  • 2 large cloves finely minced
  • 1 lb. beef roast, cubed
  • ½ c flour, seasoned with salt & pepper
  • 1 bay leat
  • 1 T rosemary, crushed
  • 2 T Olive oil
  • 4 c beef broth, low sodium
  • 12 oz Guinness extra stout (1 bottle)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Dredge the meat cubes in the flour, salt, and pepper mixture.  Work in batches and remove coated cubes to a plate.

Use a large dutch oven or other large pot. Heat the olive oil in the pan on medium-high heat.  When oil is hot, add onions and sauté them for about 2 minutes until they begin to soften.  Add the meat cubes a handful at a time, stirring occasionally.  Continue to add meat until all of it is in the pot.  Cook until meat begins to brown about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan.  Add ¼ c of the beef broth and scrape the bottom of the pan, scraping up all the flour mixture stuck to the bottom.  You may need to use a metal spatula to get all the good flour mixture up from the bottom.  Add the carrots, celery, potato and garlic.  Cook for 3-4 minutes stirring often and scraping bottom of pot.  Add the remaining beef broth, scraping the bottom one more time.  Bring stew to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Add the bay leaf, rosemary, Guinness and then salt and pepper to taste.  Simmer stew for another 30-45 minutes.

Remove bay leaf before serving.  Serve with Irish Soda Bread or some other hearty bread.

Irish Soda Bread from Joy of Cooking. Volume 2, Page 273

Preheat oven to 375º. Have all the ingredients at room temperature about 75°. Abbreviations: c=cup, T=tablespoon, and t=teaspoon.

  • 2 c sifted all-purpose flour
  • ¾ t baking soda
  • ½ t salt
  • 1 T sugar
  • 6 T chilled shortening
  • ½ to 1 c raisins
  • 1 T caraway seed
  • ½ to 2/3 c buttermilk

Mix the first four ingredients together in a large bowl.  Using a pastry cutter or two knives, cut the chilled shortening into the flour mixture until it has the consistency of corn meal.  Stir in the raisins and caraway seeds.  Add the buttermilk gradually to the bowl.  The mixture should not be dry.  Knead the dough briefly and shape into a round loaf.  Coat a cake pan with the oil and place the dough in the pan.  Cut a cross on the top of the bread letting it go over the sides so the bread will not crack in backing.  Brush the top of the bread with some of the buttermilk or regular milk.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes until the bread looks golden brown.  Tap the bottom of the loaf and if a hollow sound emerges, the bread is done.

Happy Valentine’s Day

spider_valentinesrunawaybunny

  • Kraus, Robert. How Spider Saved Valentine’s Day. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1985.
  • Brown, Margaret Wise. The Runaway Bunny.  Illustrated by Clement Hurd. New York: HarperCollins, 1942.

Happy Valentine’s Day to everyone!  Today I offer you two different stories for your pleasure.

The first is by Robert Kraus.  He gave us a spider for a hero.  In How Spider Saved Valentine’s Day Spider and his friends Lady Bug and Fly are excited for Valentine’s Day.  They attend Public Bug School No. 1. They have valentines for everyone in their class.  They each got one for their teacher, Miss Quito. As the Valentine’s Day festivities begin, they discover that they have forgotten valentines for the two caterpillars that sat in the back and slept all day.  Oh, No! What will they do?  Read this book and see how Spider saves the day!

Spider is brave and thoughtful.  This silly series is so much fun to read.  I think this is a terrific book to read to your young Valentine.

The second book is not specifically a Valentine’s Day, but it is a story of true and constant love.  I adore this book, The Runaway Bunny! Every time I read it I am completely charmed. This book is a verbal hide and seek between the mother bunny and her little one.  She lets her little one know that wherever, he/she roams Mama will always be there.  She will always love her little bunny. You can tell how much they care for each other.

If you become a bird and fly away from me,
said his mother, I will be a tree that you come home to.

 

Mama Bunny is loving and patient.  She is a role model that can be hard to live up to. I can remember some long, long days, when my girls were giving me grief.  My patience was in tatters.  I really wanted to sell them to the gypsies (not sure they would be taken).  Have you had one of those days?  On those days I took a deep breath and thought of this book and how much I really loved my little ones. We sat down, cuddled up and read this book.  It was good for all of us. After all as the little bunny said:

Shucks, said the bunny, I might just as well stay where I am and be your little bunny.

To you and to all your wonderful little ones, Happy Valentine’s Day.